Carnival/Carnivale

I remember learning about Carnival (or carnivale) in one of my old Italian classes, but the only thing I remember is all of the masks. So, I decided to write this blog about it to refresh my memory and to learn even more about it. The Carnival is an annual celebration held primarily in Venice (hence it’s usually called the Carnival of Venice) and also in other cities. To give Americans an idea of what the celebration is, it can be compared to Mardi Gras considering the celebration consists of masks, parades, masquerade balls, confetti, music, colors, lights, and chaos. It takes place 40 days before Easter, right before Ash Wednesday and the “restrictions” that come along with Lent. During my research, I found out how everything was celebrated and realized that I never found out what the holiday actually celebrated. One answer I found was “life” and I figured that was all that needed to be said about that. It’s a very joyful and inspiring celebration that is known internationally. It seems very fascinating and I would love to experience it one day.

 

 

 

 

Source:

http://www.lifeinitaly.com/culture/italian_carnivals.asp

Advertisements

One thought on “Carnival/Carnivale

  1. judithgarcia says:

    Buona sera Nina,
    Actually “Carnivale” comes from the Latin celebration of the “Carnestolendas” or the parties to celebrate the flesh, that is, the corporality of life, as opposed to the spiritual side of your soul. The root “carne” means flesh and also meat. That’s why, typically during the Carnival, people would eat up and enjoy those meals or food products that they would not be able to eat later during Lent (such as meat). The Carnival has its origin in the Greek parties to celebrate Dyonisos, the god of wine, or the Latin Saturnalia, where huge food parties would culminate in dancing, celebration and excess. With the arrival of Christianity, the Carnival was a way to prepare for the purity of prayer, fasting and abstinence of the Lent period.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s